Studying Latin literature without borders

In Focus: The ‘Features’ of Cosmopolitanism: Computers & Latin Literary Studies

The monthly blog series ‘In Focus’ is conceived as a way to show the scope and diversity of the RELICS research group. Each month one of us will reflect on a current or recently finished project, and how it connects to the aims and vision of RELICS. Through this, by drawing from our own personal experience, we want to show in which ways Latin cosmopolitanism came to the fore from antiquity until modern times. This month: Jeroen De Gussem on computers, stylometry and Latin literary studies.

In Focus: Palermo, cosmopolitanism at the crossroads

The monthly blog series ‘In Focus’ is conceived as a way to show the scope and diversity of the RELICS research group. Each month one of us will reflect on a current or recently finished project, and how it connects to the aims and vision of RELICS. Through this, by drawing from our own personal experience, we want to show in which ways Latin cosmopolitanism came to the fore from antiquity until modern times. This month: Ivo Wolsing on the cosmopolitan culture of twelfth-century Palermo.

New JOLCEL issue ‘Latin on the Margins’ out now!

The three articles we present to the reader in the second issue of JOLCEL deal with texts that are generally viewed as examples of the use of Latin in the margins. The margins in question are either geographical ones (Tlatelolco in Mexico City) or chronological ones (nineteenth-century Sweden). This issue hopes to show that what we have come to define as ‘marginal’ is only a question of perspective. In the formation of writers that we consider today to be at the margin of the Latin tradition, Latin education still was—or had recently become—a central element.

Watch the full issue here